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06

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Newsbites

07

A survey by mobile football app High5it and

the Football Supporters’ Federation (FSF)

suggests social media may not be doing

any favours to the relationship between

supporters and footballers. The research

found nearly a quarter of UK football fans

using social media have posted abusive

or negative comments about a player.

Supporters in the 16-25 age group were far

more likely to use social media to be abusive

than those over 45.

What’s more, over half of fans have also witnessed

abuse or arguments between fans and professional

players on platforms such as Twitter and Facebook.

Around half of fans believe that increased access to players

via social media negatively affects players’ performance and has

not improved their relationship with their teams. In contrast,

half believe fans of rugby union enjoy a better relationship with

the sport’s players than in football, with 44 per cent thinking the

same in respect to cricket.

Perhaps more worrying still, the survey also found that nearly

a third of fans believe that negative player behaviour – such as

feigning injury, diving and not giving their all –meant fewer football

games are being attended or watched by families and children.

Kevin Miles, chief executive of the FSF, said: “Football is the

world’s greatest sport and can be a tremendous force for good.

Thanks to social media, top-level players and fans have more

contact than ever before. We hope in time that this builds

towards greater understanding and respect on both sides.”

TIME TO VENTURE OUT?

Challenges firms faced when

trying to enter new sectors

or geographies included a

lack of expertise around

their target market, strong

competition and a lack of

financial resources.

Firms in London and the

North West were most

successful in breaking into

new markets and were also

the most confident about

the future.

BRAIN FOOD

According to the International

Labour Office, poor eating can reduce

productivity by as much as 20 per cent.

Low levels of iron, for example, can result

in poor cognitive function, impairing

performance, while low blood sugar

levels can reduce attention span and the

speed at which we process information.

Obese employees, meanwhile, are twice

as likely to be absent as fit workers.

(Source: Deloitte)

AND NOW FOR THE SCIENCE BIT...

DECISIONS

Why do we find it so hard to resist impulse buys at the end of the weekly shop? Why

does Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg wear the same plain grey T-shirt every day and

President Obama only grey or blue suits? The answer lies in the impact that multiple

choices can have on our decision-making ability. The more decisions we have to

make, however small or inconsequential, the more likely it is that decision fatigue will

set in. As Zuckerberg says, “Even making small decisions around what you wear or

what you eat for breakfast makes you tired and consumes your energy.”

Interestingly, experiments indicate a similar fatigue sets in when it comes to

our morals. Research published in the Journal of Psychological Science found

people are more likely to cheat, lie and commit fraud later in the day, because the

part of the brain responsible for ‘executive control’ becomes tired.

:) SHINY, HAPPY PEOPLE

There are many ways to motivate people, but for many of us a simple ‘thank you’

goes a long way. A nationwide survey by Argos for Business found that feeling

valued is the most important aspect of a job for 43 per cent of us, while 40 per

cent stay in our jobs because we have good relationships with our colleagues.

The opportunity to take on responsibility (26 per cent) and making a difference

(28 per cent) also rated highly among the top motivators in the workplace.

Danny Clenaghan, managing director at Argos for Business, said, “As the

research shows, simple and cost-effective everyday actions, such as saying thank

you with low-cost gift vouchers, a duvet day or allowing your team to leave 30

minutes early on a Friday, can go a long way to ensuring bosses hold onto valuable

team members. Motivated employees should be at the heart of every business,

as a continuously engaged and driven workforce is more efficient, which in turn

impacts positively on a business’ bottom line.”

TAKE A BREAK

British workers take shorter lunch

breaks, less holiday and work far

longer hours than other Europeans,

an International Congress and

Marketing survey has revealed.

The report concluded that this

behaviour is unhealthy for both

employees and organisations,

with stress and stress-related

conditions the second most

commonly reported work-related

ill health problems in Great Britain.

ONLY 37% OF UK

SMES ENTERED

NEWMARKETS IN

2014 COMPARED

WITH 53% IN 2013

Albion Ventures

NOT GOOD ENOUGH

The UK is among the top five countries

globally with the highest proportion of

women on the boards of leading companies.

According to Egon Zehnder, Europe is

making good progress in boardroom

diversity, with 20 per cent of board

directors now women compared with 15.5

per cent two years ago. However, the

figures remain low and suggest true board

diversity is still a long way off.

UNSOCIABLE MEDIA

ATTENTION, PLEASE!

While multi-tasking is a valuable skill,

many people are taking it a step too far,

resulting in a major bug-bear in today’s

workplaces. The majority (78 per cent) of

UK HR directors say employees read and

respond to emails during meetings, with

the figure rising even higher in medium-

sized companies.

New research from OfficeTeam

found the practice is not going down

well among leaders. Four in 10 believe

it’s only acceptable to read messages

during a meeting if they are urgent,

while a quarter go further, stressing

it’s never acceptable and mobile devices

should not be brought to meetings.

Rachel Stockell, senior manager at

OfficeTeam, said, “Accessibility via mobile

devices has widened the parameters

of the working day, but employees must

be aware of the broader impact it has,

including how their actions are perceived

by their managers and colleagues.”

skip lunch or eat 'al-desko' at least

once a week; 20% do it every day

take less than 30 minutes for their lunch break

never take a lunch break

NUMBER OF BARCLAYS

PREMIER LEAGUE CLUBS

AMONG THE TOP 20 WITH

THE HIGHEST REVENUE