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You | Your Team | The Game | The Industry |

01

The League Managers Association,

St. George’s Park, National Football

Centre, Newborough Road, Needwood,

Burton upon Trent, DE13 9PD

The views and opinions expressed

by contributors are their own and

not necessarily those of the League

Managers Association, its members,

officers or employees. Reproduction

in whole or in part without written

permission is strictly prohibited.

www.leaguemanagers.com

EDITOR

Alice Hoey

alicehoey1@gmail.com

EDITOR FOR LMA

Sue McKellar

sue.mckellar@leaguemanagers.com

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTOR FOR LMA

Mark Farthing

mark.farthing@leaguemanagers.com

PUBLISHER

Jim Souter

jim.souter@leaguemanagers.com

DESIGN

Sarah Ryan

sarah.ryan@leaguemanagers.com

COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR

Alex Smith

alex.smith@leaguemanagers.com

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

CONSULTANT

Adam Tarrant

adam.tarrant@leaguemanagers.com

PHOTOGRAPHY

Action Images

ILLUSTRATIONS AND IMAGES

www.istockphoto.com

/

Flaticon.com

When I called John Gregory for our cover

interview, he had only recently touched down

on home soil after his incredible win in the

Indian Super League.

After an intense five months with his Chennaiyin team, he was, as

many of you will be, looking forward to a well-deserved break. However

rewarding it is, management can be stressful, and few industries are

as high pressure and all-consuming as ours.

While the close season is an essential part of the team’s training

calendar, it also presents a number of opportunities for managers

and coaches before the whole cycle begins again. Reflection is

perhaps one of the most important, as experience is worth nothing

if you simply repeat the same mistakes over and over. Now is the time

to question what you did right, what can be built upon and what you

might try to avoid next time around.

The opportunity to grab a little R&R must also not be sniffed at, even

if like me relaxation in its conventional sense doesn’t come easily; give

me an afternoon hiking over one sunbathing any day. Whatever form

it takes, time out is as effective at resting and resetting the mind as

it is at recharging the body. Anything that takes you away from the

norm and gets you doing something you enjoy can be beneficial, as

you’ll produce more of the feel-good hormones – oxytocin, seratonin,

endorphins and dopamine – and fewer of the bad ones, such as

cortisol.

There’s nothing to feel guilty about here. Not only will you get back to

business feeling mentally and physically fitter, but you might actually

come armed with some brilliant ideas for how to move forward. Many

people do their best thinking and problem solving when they’re not

actively thinking at all. It’s a bit like sleep – it’ll come, but only when you

stop willing it to. Who knows what you’ll come up with over the next

few months.

As always, we welcome your thoughts and insight. Get in touch at

alicehoey1@gmail.com

FROM THE

EDITOR